Students have the Possibility to Eat Healthy on Campus Thanks to Tero

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Everybody knows that healthy food is the key towards a long, happier life. Research has proven this over the years and actual facts support this idea. However, it is not enough to avoid bad fats and unhealthy foods; you have to eat a lot of plants if you want to lower your bad cholesterol in a natural way.

For that matter, a new type of food is gaining a lot of field on the plant-based diet. This means that you are free to combine every color and flavor vegetables can give you. The need and demand for healthy food is obvious, so lately we can see that many alternatives to the classical restaurants have appeared.

What is the alternative

Tero opened for the public at the beginning of this spring. The lunches and dinners served here are a lot different than those from nearby locations. One advantage is that it can be found on campus, so students have a healthy alternative for all the junk food they used to eat.

The idea behind Tero is that every dish is customizable; it contains two power bowls and two flatbreads per week, so the customer can choose from a variety of options: fresh vegetables, beans, healthy fats (for example, avocado), whole grains or beans.

Tero is a good alternative especially for vegetarians because usually, they don’t find many options in regular restaurants. Customers are happy because they can eat healthy and enjoy an amazing taste at the same time.

They haven’t been on the market long, but Tero founders say that they are heading towards reaching their goals. They are happy about the way things go so far.

If you want to pay them a visit, know that Tero is open during main meals hours (lunch and dinner) at Local Point. Whenever you want to enjoy fresh, quality food, pay them a visit!

Patrick Supernaw

Patrick Supernaw is the lead editor for Great Lakes Ledger. Patrick has written for many publications including The Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. Patrick is based in Ottawa and covers issues affecting his city. In addition to his severe hockey addiction, Pat also enjoys kayaking and can often be found paddling the Rideau Canal. Contact Pat here