The Great Barrier Reef is in Danger – How It Survived Over Centuries?

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The great barrier of corals disappears little by little every day. Despite the fact that scientists were waiting for a resurrection, they now came to say that if this miracle of nature were a person, then that person would be “a patient in clinical death.”

Underwater sonar was used by the scientists to find the areas where corals from the past have risen. Rock cores where extracted, by drilling 20 holes. Fossil corals and sediments were found there, from over 30,000 years.

The largest area with coral in the world

The Great Coral Barrier, the largest coral reef in the world, stretching 2,600 kilometers, on the northeastern coast of Australia, which is visible even in space, has suffered in recent years, mainly due to climate change.

Global warming has said its word and left its mark on this miracle of nature. The water temperature broke down all the records. In February, it was 1.1 degrees celsius higher than the average, and in March it was 1.3 degrees above average.

The global warning worries the scientists

The outcome? Corals have lost their color. 93% of the reefs have been affected, and 22% of the corals have died. Thus, the situation of the Great Barrier is worrying for scientists. The Great Coral Barrier tells us that we need to stop the burning of fossil fuels if we want to have that miracle of nature that our children and grandchildren will enjoy in the future.

The disappearance of the coral barrier also involves important material losses. Only $ 6 billion annually from the annual tour of the barrier area. The same branch of tourism offers over 65,000 jobs. Large areas out of Australia’s great coral barrier, a jewel in the world heritage of humanity, have been “cooked” to destruction by the heat waves of recent years.

Patrick Supernaw

Patrick Supernaw is the lead editor for Great Lakes Ledger. Patrick has written for many publications including The Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. Patrick is based in Ottawa and covers issues affecting his city. In addition to his severe hockey addiction, Pat also enjoys kayaking and can often be found paddling the Rideau Canal. Contact Pat here

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