The Cave-Captive Thai Football Team Gets Help from Calgary Company’s Mapping Tech

A company from Calgary helped the officials to rescue the group of young Thai soccer players that were being captive in underground caves in Thailand since June 23.

The company called Intermap Technologies stated that they received a call from authorities in the Thai government as news on the captive team appeared.

The company constructed using special technology and sensors a 3D image of the interior of the cave to help rescuers in their efforts. Patrick Blott, the CEO of Intermap wrote in a news release on their website that:

“We are happy to be playing a role and using our analytics to help local University staff craft useful solutions in supporting the rescue efforts and wish for a speedy rescue and the group to return to friends and family as soon as possible.”

Finding the Best Way to Save the Captives With No Casualty

He then explained how they could assist the Thai officials:

“We create a 3D rendering of the surface, the underground, the cave, the likely points where people could be, how the water is going to flow, what potential entry and exit points are, how deep it is.”

Using the map, Blott said that the rescuers were able to find the best ways to make the diving short for both the crew and the boys to safely get out of the cave.

A few hours ago, Intermap delivered their model to the Thai authorities.

Intermap delivered the model to Thai authorities in just about three hours.

So far, four of the 12 boys were rescued, and there are still eight boys and their coach inside the cave. Until today’s second attempt, the crew members have been working to send them oxygen tanks.

The second operation started today at 11 a.m. local time (midnight ET) and it took several hours. According to the latest news, the team saved four more boys, one of them taken to the hospital on a stretcher, but all in good health. Now, inside the cave, there are four more boys and their coach, waiting for a new rescue attempt and hoping the water levels won’t rise.

Rex Austin

Rex Austinwas born and raised in Thunder Bay Ontario on the shores of Lake Superior. Apart from running his own podcast (Ice Fishing And Other “Cool” Things), he spends his time canoeing and backpacking in Northern Ontario.. As a journalist Rex has published stories for Global News (Thunder Bay) we well as Buzz Feed and Joystiq. As a contributor to Great Lakes Ledger, Rex most covers science and health stories. Contact Rexhere