Elon Musk Argues Scientific Studies and says that People can Survive on Mars

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Nobody can deny the fact that Elon Musk is one of the most eccentric billionaires. Still, to argue a scientific study seems a little too much, even for him. It looks like he’s not willing to let anything stand between him and the intention of going and living to Mars. Some people praise Musk for his plans, but others think that he’s just acting crazy, like many before him.

What caused the argument between Musk and scientists

Apparently, SpaceX and Tesla’s founder has big dreams. He wants to colonise Mars and make the planet accessible to more and more people. This week, scientists cut off his enthusiasm when they presented a detailed study about the environmental conditions from the Red Planet. The research made it clear that Mars’s atmosphere doesn’t have enough carbon dioxide for entertaining proper living conditions for humans.

Of course, Musk didn’t like this, so he declared once again that he doesn’t consider the experts’ opinions accurate, so he won’t give up on his plans. The billionaire still want to live on Mars, therefore he suggested that a good way to find out if the planet can support life is to drop a thermonuclear weapon on it.

The experts’ opinion

The team of scientists who worked on the study included their findings in a paper recently published in Nature Astronomy journal. After many experiments, they concluded that the amount of carbon dioxide from the Red Planet is only a fifth of the quantity necessary for terraforming Mars and giving it a new atmosphere, suitable for supporting us.

Elon Musk has a different opinion. He claims that researchers are wrong, because the percentage of carbon dioxide is far more important than they discovered and that it was hard to spot it because it was absorbed by the soil.

Musk added that the gas can be brought to surface by heating. As eccentric as it may seem, it looks like his statement is supported by another study published in 1993. These arguments are enough to determine scientists to send more spacecraft to the red planet with the purpose of finding out more about Mars’s componence.

Dee Mongo

Dee Mongo is a graduate of UFT. She’s based in Toronto and has written for Maclean’s, Motherboard, the National Post, and the Huffington Post. In her spare time, she plays AC/DC on the ukulele and does psychic readings for B-grade celebrities. Dee is our tech/finance correspondent.