A Bone Fragment Dating Back 2.5 Million Years has been Unearthed on Cape Coral City Land

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Although it might not seem like it, about 2.5 million years ago even a now ordinary plot of land from Cape Coral was roamed by mammoths and mastodons. There have been crews working on the utilities project down there and they came across a bone fragment.

What did they find?

The prehistoric bone fragment was unearthed last month, after being buried under 13 feet of soil. The residents look with admiration at this finding, thinking that is yet another proof in supporting the theory of evolution.

The bone is almost a foot long and 10 inches wide and we aren’t sure yet if it comes from a mastodon or a wooly mammoth. To be more exact, the fragment was part of the humerus, the bone that connects the shoulders to elbows.

Another citizen, Ethan Soehnlein explained that he didn’t expect to have something bigger than elephants today to be buried in the proximity of his home. He is amazed by the finding and believes that there might be more pieces of history buried somewhere close by.

What do the archaeologists have to say?

For now, at least, the archaeologists involved aren’t sure about the exact date. However, they believe that this bone dates back 2.5 million years ago, at least. This means that the bone was on this Earth long before humans appeared on this planet.

The analyses made show that there are probably more fossils similar to this one on the plot. However, the area belongs to the City of Cape Coral and they are going ahead with their scheduled project.

Rios would very much like that the city hall will halt the project for a while and see if there aren’t more ‘cool’ things, as he puts it, buried around.

Patrick Supernaw

Patrick Supernaw is the lead editor for Great Lakes Ledger. Patrick has written for many publications including The Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. Patrick is based in Ottawa and covers issues affecting his city. In addition to his severe hockey addiction, Pat also enjoys kayaking and can often be found paddling the Rideau Canal. Contact Pat here