Measles Warning Raised In Vancouver for Skookum, SkyTrain, Restaurant And More

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Vancouver Coastal Health warned anyone who was present at the Skookum Festival, visited Noodlebox in Mount Pleasant or the Outdoor Community Block Party, or used public transit in Vancouver that they might have contracted measles. The announcement came as one individual who attended those locations is confirmed with the virus.

A thorough list of the specific locations and times, ranging from Saturday to Tuesday, has been put up on the Vancouver health authorities site. According to it, every person who attended the before-mentioned locations, who has not been fully vaccinated against measles, nor had the disease in the past, might have already contracted the disease so they should visit a doctor as soon as possible.

The Vancouver health authority also stated that every individual who attended the location mentioned above and is not already immune to measles should immediately get the vaccine doses within six days of exposure to protect against the virus.

Measles warning raised in Vancouver as one person confirmed with the virus attended Skookum, SkyTrain, restaurant and more

If anyone contracted the virus during the mentioned events should develop the first symptoms of measles anytime between September 15th and September 29th and must consult with a doctor.

“The active measles virus can remain in a room or on a surface for two hours after the person has left. So if someone was on a bus, it could remain on that bus for two hours after that person left the bus,” explained Tiffany Akins of the Vancouver Coastal Health. “That’s why it’s so important just to be vaccinated because it spreads through the air,” she added.

The majority of the people should already be immune to measles as they got their vaccine doses or previously contracted the virus in the past. However, as the Vancouver health authorities warned, those born between 1970 and 1994 or who spent their childhood outside of British Columbia might have only gotten one dose of the vaccine, so they need to see a doctor to get the second one.

Stacy Richardson

Stacy Richardson is a seasoned journalist with 15 years experience.. She has conducted numerous research studies on media effects including the effects of bullying on adolescents, and “sexy media” effects on sexual behavior.  As a contributor to Great Lakes Ledger, Stacy covers stories affecting local politics and economy. Contact Stacy here.