Worldwide Spread Deadly Virus Makes the First Victim in Canada

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During 2018 hundreds of cases of West Nile Virus were reported and according to Sputnik, the mosquito-borne infection has already killed 22 people.

The most recent West Nile Virus (WNV) victim, according to blackburnnews.com, was from Canada.

Based on what Windsor-Essex County Health Unit said in a news release on Friday, this is the beginning of the season attributed to the virus in the country and already made a victim.

Besides that, the WNV situation is still risky until it dies due to temperatures below freezing.

Advice for residents

The health unit advised residents to stay protected as certain types of mosquitoes spread the West Nile Virus and getting bitten results in severe infections.
26 mosquito traps were set up across and in Windsor-Essex, according to health officials, and the mosquitos tested positive for WNV.

Residents are advised to remove any standing water existent around their home, use insect repellents in order to protect themselves from possible mosquito bites, do not leave the house at dawn and dusk as the mosquitos are the most active and verify that the screens of the windows and doors in their homes are free of any holes and tight.

Mosquitos spread the West Nile Virus to humans by feeding on the blood of an infected animal and carrying it to other animals and people two weeks later.

The virus cannot be spread directly from infected animals to humans or from person to person.

Further information regarding the West Nile Virus

In 1937 the virus started spreading from the West Nile region of Uganda and people from Europe, Middle East, Africa, and the Indian subcontinent suffered from it.

The virus was detected in New York City as well as in 1999 making seven victims.

Patrick Supernaw

Patrick Supernaw is the lead editor for Great Lakes Ledger. Patrick has written for many publications including The Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. Patrick is based in Ottawa and covers issues affecting his city. In addition to his severe hockey addiction, Pat also enjoys kayaking and can often be found paddling the Rideau Canal. Contact Pat here