NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Pinpointed The Mars Curiosity Rover in The Perseverance Valley

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NASA’ Mars Curiosity rover went into hibernation mode when a massive dust storm hit the Red Planet, and engineers have ever since waited for the robot’s batteries to be maintained long enough for the rover to wake up once the storm dissipated. Now, NASA spotted the Curiosity rover, visible as a small white spot in the middle of a crater in the so-called Perseverance Valley.

NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spotted the Mars Curiosity rover in Perseverance Valley

NASA viewed its Mars rover from a satellite that orbits Mars at 267 kilometers above its orbit. NASA announced on Tuesday that the high-resolution camera of its Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter satellite was able to photograph, on September 20th, the area where Opportunity has been hibernating since a gigantic dust storm hit Mars in June.

The rover was spotted in the so-called Perseverance Valley on Mars, weeks after the gigantic dust storm on the Red Planet diminished.

NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover went into hibernation mode months ago when a massive dust storm on Mars emerged

Without sunlight to power its solar batteries blocked by the dust storm, the NASA’s Mars Opportunity rover went into hibernation mode, and NASA engineers have ever since hoped that the robot’s batteries would resist long enough for them to wake up the robot once the storm dissipated.

Now, as the dust storm on Mars passed, NASA has not yet been able to resume contact with its Mars rover, also known as “Oppy,” which was long considered immortal since its initial mission, which began in 2004, was only set for 90 days.

The Mars’ surface is visible in the satellite images taken by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, as the dust storm dissipated showing the Curiosity Mars rover’s position.

Also, on August 31st, NASA allowed its rover some time to reconnect with the Earth’s mission center until mid-October. When that term expires, NASA will consider the Mars Curiosity rover’s mission accomplished for good.

Stacy Richardson

Stacy Richardson is a seasoned journalist with 15 years experience.. She has conducted numerous research studies on media effects including the effects of bullying on adolescents, and “sexy media” effects on sexual behavior.  As a contributor to Great Lakes Ledger, Stacy covers stories affecting local politics and economy. Contact Stacy here.