Ceres Might have Changed its Orientation

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Before the dwarf planet, Ceres was visited by us, it was already known that its density is twice that of water. Much of its outer crust might be water as its core was proven to be rocky. Scientists believe that the water we knew about previously has turned into glaciers and other types of ice as the temperatures from Ceres make the water be pretty malleable.

On the other side, Ceres is actually covered in ridges, craters and what used to be ice volcanoes, so that is not the case. This is an argument that sustains the affirmation that the crust Ceres has is far more rigid. What makes the situation more complicated though is that this planet does not only have dust and water mixed together as its composition.

Pasquale Tricarico, a researcher that has analyzed how the material is distributed on Ceres, confirms that the equator planet relocated due to the planet being so consistent with the densest material. Besides that, he also discovered a series of ridges which he considered to be the equator the dwarf planet used to have. That means that Ceres tipped over on its side somewhen in its history of existence.

It is not hard to prove this as the mapping of the planet’s density is not hard to do. It sure has some, but we know that its average density wights about two grams per cubic centimeter but when it comes to the crust the game changes. Its sizes are 1.7 g/cm>3 and range up to above 2.3 g/cm>3. We can affirm that in the way the material is distributed in the crust has many spatial differences.

However, it is interesting how a planet has simply relocated its equator. If that were to happen on Earth, it would have surely looked like an Apocalypse.

Patrick Supernaw

Patrick Supernaw is the lead editor for Great Lakes Ledger. Patrick has written for many publications including The Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. Patrick is based in Ottawa and covers issues affecting his city. In addition to his severe hockey addiction, Pat also enjoys kayaking and can often be found paddling the Rideau Canal. Contact Pat here