Flu Shot Lowers Risks Of Hospitalization for Flu in Pregnant Women, A Study Finds

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Recent research confirmed that flu shot reduces risks of hospitalization for flu in pregnant women. The new study, issued earlier today in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, is just the most recent evidence that supports the importance of influenza vaccination which experienced unsubstantiated claims that they are unsafe, as reported by CTVNews.

Researchers in Canada, the US, Israel, and Australia gathered data from about 2 million pregnant women from 2010 to 201. They found that those who had their flu shot presented a lower risk of hospitalization for flu-related conditions by more than 40%.

“A lot of women are really scared to get anything during their pregnancy, so they’re afraid to get vaccines. But women who are pregnant are more likely to be hospitalized if they get influenza,” explained Jeffrey Kwong from the ICES and Public Health Ontario, and one of the study’s co-authors.

Also, this recent research is the first to establish a direct link between influenza vaccination and reduced risks of hospitalization for flu in pregnant women.

Flu Shot Lowers Risks Of Hospitalization for Flu in Pregnant Women

Influenza is very dangerous for pregnant women whose immune systems, as well as the circulatory and respiratory systems, are changing with the evolution of pregnancy exposing them to more flu-related issues.

“Expecting mothers face a number of threats to their health and the health of their baby during pregnancy, and getting the flu is one of them. This study’s findings underscore the fact that there is a simple, yet impactful way to reduce the possibility of complications from flu during pregnancy: get a flu shot,” stated Allison Naleway from the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Oregon.

“There’s a perception that [influenza vaccine] may not be safe. It’s important that we keep doing studies. Every year the flu shot is a little bit different. That’s why there are studies continually confirming these are safe vaccines,” concluded Jeffrey Kwong.