Massive Solar Storm Detonated Mines During The Vietnam War

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The scientists think they solved out one of the most significant mysteries of the Vietnam War. In 1972, a squadron of American pilots flying over North Vietnam witnessed the bizarre detonation of a sea of bombs without an apparent reason. Since then, researchers have tried deciphering this strange event. Now, they believe that a massive solar storm detonated mines during the Vietnam War.

According to the scientists from the University of California at Boulder stated that magnetized gas hurled at our planet by a solar storm caused the detonation of the bombs in 1972. The research also stressed out the damaging effects of massive solar wind and its impact on our world based on electricity and wires.

Professor Delores Knipp was the one who struggled to solve out this mystery, and she couldn’t reach any conclusions without a declassified US Army document that linked a massive solar storm to the detonation of mines during the Vietnam War, back in 1972.

Massive Solar Storm Detonated Mines During The Vietnam War

“I started reading this report, and I said ‘wow, this really happened. In the process of researching this event, I realized that this was, in fact, a great storm. But it was also such an odd storm in the way it developed and the way it hit the earth. What this event does is give us a sense of the range of what these great storms could look like,” Delores Knipp explained.

According to scientists, a massive solar storm can burn out power stations, causing the cut off the water supply and leaving the satellites that orbit the Earth in the dark.

The first time such a mighty solar wind was documented was about 150 years ago when Richard Carrington described the event as an eruption. That phenomenon is now known as “The Carrington Event.” Back then, there were no phones, computers, and other pieces of technology which nowadays are omnipresent in our lives, so the massive solar storm’s damage was minimal.