NASA To Announce Its First Commercial Partners For “Returning To The Moon” Mission

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NASA, forced by the Trump administration, is taking big leaps to advance its “returning to the Moon” mission. To achieve that, the US space agency is planning to sign some partnerships and, today, NASA will announce its first commercial partners. The US space agency is also thinking of a future Mars mission which would happen in the 2030s.

As for its plans to return to the Moon, NASA scheduled a press conference for today, November 29th, during which they would reveal its first commercial partners that would have the mission to assist the US space agency in their plans. The meeting would be held at NASA’s headquarters in Washington, DC, starting at 2 PM ET. NASA’s Administrator Jim Bridenstine will head the news conference.

“Working with US companies is the next step to achieving long-term scientific study and human exploration of the Moon and Mars,” NASA officials stated recently in a media alert.

NASA To Announce Its First Commercial Partners For “Returning To The Moon” Mission

Along with Jim Bridenstine, NASA Administrator, there will be at the conference representatives of the commercial partners the US space agency selected, Thomas Zurbuchen the leader of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, astronaut Stan Love, Andrea Mosie, Apollo sample-laboratory manager, and Barbara Cohen, a researcher who works with NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission, Space.com reported.

NASA plans to have a fully operational space station orbiting the Moon by 2023, while the US space agency expects to land a human crew on the Earth’s natural satellite later in the 2020s. In the meantime, they will deploy lunar rovers to explore the surface of the Moon in more details than ever.

With the commercial partners, NASA plans to ensure the growth of the American space exploration program on the Moon and the Mars later in the 2030s. Private companies with which the US space agency plans to work will also have the mission to help NASA reduce the costs of its projects as much as possible.