Lunar Water: NASA Satellite Spots “Moving Water” On The Moon

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NASA just discovered that there’s evidence of water molecules which are reportedly bouncing around the lunar orb’s dayside. This was reported by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) study has claimed.

This massive discovery comes after a lot of assumptions that have surfaced claimed that the Moon is dry and inhospitable to liquid water.

Until the last decade, NASA said that astronomers were only expecting water to exist in isolated pockets of ice and just near the poles of the Moon.

The more recent discoveries have challenged the way in which scientists understand lunar hydration.

Water on the moon

Now astronomers seem to believe that small amounts of water on the surface are bound to the Moon’s dusty grey soil which is called regolith.

These tiny batches of water vary in amount and locations, and they also seem to be depending on the time of the day.

This discovery is more than exciting because it can reportedly help a better plan for future missions to the Moon in case we were to set up a base of residence there, reveals Express.so.uk.

Amanda Hendrix, the study’s lead author, said: “These results aid in understanding the lunar water cycle and will ultimately help us learn about the accessibility of water that can be used by humans in future missions to the Moon.

What can be done with lunar water?

“Lunar water can potentially be used by humans to make fuel or to use for radiation shielding or thermal management; if these materials do not need to be launched from Earth, that makes these future missions more affordable,’ Hendrix said.

The discovery found water molecules which are bonded to the surface of the Moon until the temperatures become higher around noon.

Then, they bounce around until they land in a location which is cold enough for the water to cool down and get back to the surface.