Climate Change Now Threatens Humans And Marine Life More Than Ever

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Even middle-schoolers know from their science class that the scientific consensus we call global warming is a real thing and it is getting worse if people are not intervening. Teachers along with B.C. students have been gathering all they need for unprecedented strike action on Friday, as they feel so strongly about the issue. Now, climate change seems to threaten humans and marine life more than ever.

The predictions of the latest UN report are horrifying, and they include climate poverty hitting hundreds of millions of people, 15–37 percent of all species’ extinction, and the death of all coral reefs.

Because of these drastic changes, scientists around the globe are focusing on what could be done to avoid all these adverse consequences of global warming. Based near Sidney and part of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), the Institute of Ocean Sciences (IOS) has been tracking the changes that affect the sea.

Climate change endangers humans and marine life more than ever

The acting manager of the Ocean Sciences Division at IOS, Jon Chamberlain, explained that his organization’s programmes include hyper-accurate, world-class science. However, he refused to comment on how the politicians will interpret their findings, but he did not mind talking facts.

“There are changes that are being seen, that is without a doubt. We perhaps see the signals faster in the Arctic, but if you look around the B.C. coastline you will find them, too,” Jon Chamberlain says. From an oceanic perspective, “the two evil twins of climate change are temperature and ocean acidification,” he added.

The atmosphere of the Earth is abundant on CO2, and inevitably some of it enters the oceans. CO2 reacts with the water, and the PH level changes so that the water becomes more acidic than before. In order to create finely-calibrated computer models that simulate how the Earth is likely to change, the IOS uses a combination of researchers in the field, scientific studies, supercomputer data and some of the brightest programmers in Canada. The conclusion was that climate change now threatens humans and marine life more than ever.