Pollinating Insects Are In Decline In Britain And Not Only, And That Would Affect Biodiversity

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The planet is going through some tough times, and things are about to become even more difficult. A new study reveals that multiple pollinating insects from Britain are in decline. Unfortunately, it appears that the rarer species are more vulnerable now.

According to scientists, biodiversity will be directly affected, but even worse effects will take place. The decimation of these insects will also affect the ability to grow food crops.

The study analyzed trends in 353 hoverflies and wild bees from 1980 in England, Scotland, and Wales. It appears that there were declines in a third of the species. Only 10% of the pollinating insects became more abundant, and on that list, we can see bees that pollinate flowering crops. While it is a good thing that the number of crop pollinators is increasing, the species have declined overall.

Multiple pollinating insects are in decline, and that would affect the entire planet

“It would be risky to rely on this group to support the long-term food security for our country,” he said. If anything happens to them in the future, there will be fewer other species to step up and fulfill the essential role of crop pollination,” Dr. Gary Powney of the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH) in Wallingford, Oxfordshire.

It appears that the specialized species recorded most losses. According to Dr. Nick Isaac from the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology CEH in Wallingford, Oxfordshire, this is terrible news especially when it comes to conservation and wildlife.

“Every square kilometer in the UK has lost an average of 11 species of bee and hoverfly, between 1980 and 2013, according to the new analysis,” said Dr. Lynn Dicks of the University of East Anglia. “It’s a process of homogenization and leaves us with a natural world that is far poorer and less resilient to change.”