Hubble Space Telescope Has Finally Reached Its Limits After 29 Years of Activity

In its more than 29 years after its liftoff, the Hubble Space Telescope has presented the human world with the best views of the Universe, discovering stars and galaxies of many types. Hubble is the more fantastic tool humans ever had for observing and finding the most distant edges of the Universe, but now it has apparently reached its limit.

The extent of its mirror limits the famous telescope, while the value of its tools, its temperature and wavelength reach, and also time are other limitations, too. Hubble was the one telescope that provided us with sharper views of the Universe, delivering practical resolutions that amazed the world.

One of the most crucial elements in finding what is the Universe composed of, and what it holds is resolution or sharpness, but other factors are just as important, such as the quantity of light-gathering power you have, crucial to see the slightest bodies possible, the field-of-view of the telescope which allows you to monitor numerous objects, and the wavelength extent you are able to probe, because the analyzed object’s wavelength relies on the body’s distance from you.

The more advanced James Webb Space Telescope will soon replace the Hubble Space Telescope

The Hubble Space Telescope is incredible at all these elements, but it also has basic limits for them all. Hubble may have got to its limits, but future telescopes will allow us to see much more than its limits. For example, the James Webb Space Telescope is not only bigger, with the main mirror diameter of 6.5 meters, whereas Hubble has 2.4 meters, but it also runs in more cooler climates, allowing it to see longer wavelengths.

At these wavelengths, James Webb will be capable of seeing through the light-blocking powder that obstructs Hubble’s sight of the majority of the Universe. In addition, it will be capable of sighting bodies with greater redshifts and earlier lookback times. Hubble might discover some incredibly young galaxies, but James Webb might identify them as they were in the action of shaping for the first time.

Hubble is still expanding our understanding into the farthest Universe, and still gathers the information that allows astronomers to extend the bounds of what we already know even if it has its limits. But to see better, to go farther, to know more, better instruments are needed. If we