Snaps Of The Most Powerful Gamma-Ray Bursts Ever Recorded Released By Scientists

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In our daily tasks, we don’t think or even know that, in the Universe, big explosions are happening. The most potent blasts are occurring because of the gamma-rays that are practically bursting. Every day, quick and powerful gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) takes place, and it results because of giant stars that collapse or when others merge, in galaxies far away from the Milky Way, at least, according to some recent studies.

With the help of two telescopes from Namibia (HESS) and Spain (MAGIC), researchers found out about two gamma-rays bursts. The explosions were measured, and they were 100 billion times more potent in energy than the light we see. This explosion is one of the most powerful ever observed and measured by humans, maybe the most powerful from the Universe, whatsoever. Also, the fact that the ground telescopes have detected the explosion is a first.

Regarding this discovery and new information, there are three studies published in the Nature journal. David Berge, who is the gamma-rays author of the study and an astronomer at DESY, is saying that these kinds of events are the vastest and powerful explosions ever.

Scientists showed the images of the most potent gamma-ray bursts in the Universe

What is even more fascinating about the gamma-ray bursts is that their released force is stronger than the Sun’s energy during all its lifetime, summed up. Also, they are happening in a few seconds and are shining throughout the whole Universe.

Moreover, the two powerful gamma-ray explosions happened in July 2018 and January 2019. In both cases, NASA alerted the astronomers’ community, and everyone’s eyes were on the sky. The burst from January was observed after 57 seconds after the start of the explosion, and for twenty minutes, they saw thousands of photons from GRB 190114C.

Finally, all the researchers from the study are attributing the success to the two telescopes that offered the possibility of seeing the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in high energy, not after they extinguished.