Iraq Is In The Midst Of A Nose-Bleed Fever Outbreak

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It’s been reported that an epidemic of a fever that brings death by blemishes is sweeping Iraq. There have been 111 instances of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever this year, with 19 fatalities, according to the WHO. Half of the country’s cases have been reported in one area in the southern part of Iraq, where the illness has been spreading quickly.

As per doctors, both internally and outwardly excessive bleeding, particularly from the nose, is caused by the virus. The death rate in these situations is about two-fifths. As of this year, there have been more instances than ever reported in the 43 years since it was originally discovered in Iraq.

Is there anything we know about it?

Tick-borne viral infection is the cause of CCHF, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1944, Crimean hemorrhagic fever was discovered and given the name. In 1969, the disease was identified as the source of sickness in the Congo, leading to the present moniker.

Infected ticks may transmit disease to animals. It is possible for the CCHF virus to be transferred to humans through tick bites or by direct touch with contaminated animal blood or flesh at the slaughterhouse. It is estimated that between 10% and 40% of CCHF deaths are caused by the disease.

Is there a way to avoid this?

There is no vaccination for this virus, and it might appear suddenly. The long-term consequences of CCHF infections in survivors have not been researched well enough by the CDC to identify whether or not particular problems are present. The recuperation process, however, is taking a long time. Farmers and veterinarians are the primary focus. Farmers, slaughterhouse employees as well as veterinarians are more likely to get the disease since it is mainly spread by ticks on animals.