NASA’s DAVINCI Mission Will Check If Venus Could Sustain Life

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In 2029, NASA plans to conduct a mission to Venus that will fly past and drop into the planet’s hostile atmosphere. There will be no flybys or descents for the DAVINCI Deep Atmosphere Venus Investigation of Noble gases, Chemistry and Imaging project.

By June 2031, the spacecraft is planned to arrive on the surface of Venus and begin its exploration of the planet’s stratified atmosphere. Scientists have been wanting to measure Venus since the early 1980s, and now the DAVINCI mission will be able to do it. Pioneer in 1978 and Magellan in the early 1990s were the only two NASA missions that have visited the second planet from our sun.

The DAVINCI spacecraft is basically a flying chemical laboratory that can analyze many elements of Venus’ atmosphere and environment and snap the first descent photos of the planet’s peaks. Map the Venusian terrain and determine the composition of Venus’ mountainous highlands using sensors on board the mission.

According to NASA scientists, Venus’ “tesserae” resemble Earth’s continents, suggesting plate tectonics on the planet. The program would also look at the likelihood of an ocean on Venus by analyzing gases and water components in the atmosphere’s lowest layer. Even though Venus had oceans and a climate comparable to Earth’s, something changed it into a world with temperatures high enough to melt lead as the first livable world in our solar system.

According to new research, Venus may have had steady temperatures and liquid water for billions of years until a catastrophic catastrophe occurred. Physical scientist Michael Way of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Science in New York City has also co-authored research on Venus’s history of temperature and seas in 2016. As of right now, Venus is a largely dead planet with a poisonous atmosphere ninety times thicker than Earth’s and surface temperatures reaching 864°F.