Drug Treatment Could Treat Cataracts In The Future

By , in Health Sci/Tech on . Tagged width: , ,

With the help of Professor Barbara Pierscionek at Anglia Ruskin University, there is great hope for drug medication for cataracts, the affliction that has affected tens of millions of people globally for decades. When the treatment was tested in the lab, it showed promising results. There had been an international group of scientists testing a potential drug for cataracts led by Professor Barbara Pierscionek.

VP1-001 may hold the key to eradicating cataracts. Oxysterol compound VP1-001 may be the cure for cataracts the world has been looking forward to. Sixty-one percent of the lenses tested showed improvements in the refractive index profiles, indicating that the protein organization had been restored. For the first time, an anti-cataract drug has been shown to have positive effects on the optics of a lens in this study. Research of this nature has never been done before.

Certain types of cataracts improved, but not all, implying that it might be a remedy for particular types of cataracts. This shows that the development of anti-cataract medications may necessitate making distinctions between different types of cataracts. It’s a big step in the right direction toward using drugs instead of surgery to treat an extremely common condition.

Cataracts affect over 24 million Americans over the age of 40, and only surgery has been able to eliminate this condition so far. A new set of lenses is placed in place of the old, cloudy ones in the eyes. The recovery period can last anywhere from two to six weeks, but the procedure itself has a high rate of success, so it’s well worth the time. Unfortunately, the majority of cataracts develop on their own as people age. At some point after the age of 40, proteins found in the eye’s lens begin to aggregate and obscure vision due to an accumulation of dust and other debris on the lens.