NASA’s James Webb Telescope Gets Closer to Discovering the Most Distant Galaxies in the Universe

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NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) keeps aiming its next-generation and powerful gear at the depths of the Cosmos. Exploring extremely distant galaxies was one of the main purposes of the telescope from the very beginning, and it’s amazing to see how certain steps are taken in that direction.

Data from JWST and spectroscopic observations now reveal the discovery of the oldest galaxies in the Universe that astronomers know about. The galaxies in question formed when our Universe was just “an infant,” meaning only about 400 million years after the Big Bang.

13.4 billion light-years away

The galaxies in question are located 13.4 billion light-years away from us, which obviously means that they are very, very far away. If we could somehow travel at the speed of light, we would still need 13.4 billion years to reach those galaxies. But of course, no spaceship can travel at anywhere near the speed of light, and we’re pretty sure that nobody can live that long for such a long-lasting ride.

Surely there will be people out there who choose to remain skeptical about the new discovery. They should definitely take a look at what Brant Robertson, a co-author of the University of California, has to say:

For the first time, we have discovered galaxies only 350 million years after the big bang, and we can be absolutely confident of their fantastic distances,

To find these early galaxies in such stunningly beautiful images is a special experience.

Scientists leading the development of the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and the Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) that are mounted on the James Webb Telescope have collaborated to make the new observations possible.

The James Webb Space Telescope was launched by NASA back in late December 2021 after numerous delays. While numerous people lost hope that Webb would ever be launched, NASA made a surprise and a great present to many on Christmas.