Americans Encouraged to Carry Kits that Stops Opioid Overdose

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Indiana’s former state commissioner decided to advise Americans to carry opioid drug overdose reversal kits with them. However, this drug is not cheap even if one can purchase it without a prescription from any pharmacy. In order to tackle this problem, Indiana’s State Department of Health had decided to make a number of naloxone kits available to those that would like to carry them free of charge, the main condition being that they must sit through a training session.

How many kits are available

Back in August 2016 when this program started to get federal funds 49 county health departments received almost 14 thousand naloxone kits. Out of all the counties, Marion county distributed the most kits and carried the most training sessions.

These kits were passed on to churches, motels, liquor stores, community centers and even truck stops, with the main purpose in mind that by doing this people that overdose on opioids would have their life saved by someone in the area that had both the training to aid someone in that situation and the kit needed to do so.

Why do people come to training sessions

In some cases parents have decided to come to these training sessions because their child had accidentally had an opioid overdose or just because they want to be prepared in case that ever happens. Other people come to these training sessions because they know people or they have family members that are going through rehab or that are addicts and they want to be there if an accident happens and hopefully save their life.

The fact that many people decide to come to these training sessions means that they are aware that there is a problem and that they are willing to help fight the battle against it and now more than ever every man counts.

Patrick Supernaw

Patrick Supernaw is the lead editor for Great Lakes Ledger. Patrick has written for many publications including The Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. Patrick is based in Ottawa and covers issues affecting his city. In addition to his severe hockey addiction, Pat also enjoys kayaking and can often be found paddling the Rideau Canal. Contact Pat here