Russian Cosmonaut Allays The Worries Regarding The Oxygen Leak on ISS

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A Russian cosmonaut released a video today showing the hole that caused a slight oxygen leak on a Soyuz ship docked to the International Space Station (ISS), ensuring that “everything is quiet” on board. That is the first time that images of this tiny hole discovered on August 30th have been officially released, as NASA had deleted its footage “by error” after briefly releasing it on the Internet.

“As you can see, everything is quiet on board. As always, we live in peace and friendship,” said Sergei Prokopiev in a video published on his VK page, the Russian equivalent of Facebook. “Please don’t worry,” added the 43-year-old cosmonaut with a big smile on his face.

He then explained how the two Russian cosmonauts on the ISS discovered, on August 30th, the two-millimeter hole that caused the slight oxygen leak on the International Space Station.

The theory of sabotage of the Soyuz rocket docked to the ISS is not yet ruled out

Less than a week after the discovery of the oxygen leak, which did not endanger the lives of the astronauts on the ISS, the director of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, Dmitri Rogozin, created a huge buzz online after referring to possible sabotage of the Soyuz rocket docked to the ISS.

“There is also another version that we do not exclude: deliberate sabotage in space,” he said.

The hole is located on the part of the Soyuz rocket which will not be used for the astronauts return to Earth. A commission of inquiry has been set up to determine who is responsible.

The Russian space sector experienced several significant setbacks between 2015 and 2017, such as the loss of a Progress cargo ship, the failure of a Proton launcher, or the discovery of several defects on most engines produced for rockets.

Stacy Richardson

Stacy Richardson is a seasoned journalist with 15 years experience.. She has conducted numerous research studies on media effects including the effects of bullying on adolescents, and “sexy media” effects on sexual behavior.  As a contributor to Great Lakes Ledger, Stacy covers stories affecting local politics and economy. Contact Stacy here.