Sunken City Discovered On Google Earth

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Google Earth users discovered many mysterious sights using the app. This time a YouTube conspirator that goes by the username MrMBB333 claims to have discovered a sunken city. It all started when he was exploring on Google Earth and he discovered a suspicious seabed bump, located around 90 feet underwater. The discovery was made around a mile and a half from the coast of Long Beach in Los Angeles.

He shared all these things in this video, explaining that he believes that he found a sunken city. More specifically, he thinks that he has found the “perimeter wall” and an entrance for those who lived there. The length of this city is around a mile long and half a mile wide. The user also mentioned that similar walls were used for old cities, such as Rome in 275 AD.

Was Atlantis discovered?

The video managed to gain more than 40000 right away and it attracted numerous conspiracy lovers. “You can tell it’s not something that’s just random – it was intelligently designed,” the author of the video explains. By changing the filter of the satellite image, the user goes on to identify houses located inside the walls of the city.

Speculations began in the comments. Many users believe that the theory of MrMBB333, while others believe that it might be an underwater military base. Other viewers encouraged divers to go there and find the truth. On the other hand, there were also some sceptics believe that it is just the sand dredging to make concrete.

At the moment, we have no official response from Google and we still do not know for sure what the mysterious shape is. It remains to see if it is truly sunken city or something a lot less impressive.

Patrick Supernaw

Patrick Supernaw is the lead editor for Great Lakes Ledger. Patrick has written for many publications including The Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. Patrick is based in Ottawa and covers issues affecting his city. In addition to his severe hockey addiction, Pat also enjoys kayaking and can often be found paddling the Rideau Canal. Contact Pat here