Increased Rate of Cannabis Consumption Was Present Even Before Marijuana Legalization in Canada

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There are many discussions about weather they should legalize cannabis or not, and marijuana there’s also present. And due to the fact that the increased access to medical marijuana happened, that might have encouraged high school students to get the drug, before it even became legal in Canada. In short, there was increased consumption of cannabis in Canadian teens and young adults even before the drug became legal in Canada.

A recent study has used data from 230,000 questionnaires filled by Canadian high school students from grade 9 to grade 12. It has found out that 10% have used the drug once per week in 2017 and 2018, and 18% said that they had used it at least once in the last year. Both of these groups of marijuana consumers have shown their lowest points in 2014 and 2015, with 9% and 15%, respectively. It seems, however, that there was an increased rate of cannabis consumption even before the drug became legal in Canada.

An increased rate of cannabis consumption in Canadian teens was present even before the legalization of marijuana in Canada

The lead author of the study, Alex Zuckermann, said that the problem started to appear while the legalization was still being discussed before there was anything concrete about changing the law. With this and medicinal use, more people started to change their opinion in 2014. Before, the cannabis use in youth was declining.

In the study, the demographic groups that saw the most significant increase since the years 2014 and 2015 were females and local people. The weekly use went from 7% to 19% during this specific period. The locals weekly use from 23% to 25%. The occasional use, from 18% to 21%. It is ironic because we tend to believe that male youth keeps talking about it, so you might expect them to break the record, but females lead on this one. From a historical point of view, cannabis consumption in women has been slurred.