Tropical Forest Carbon Sinks Are More Varied Than Initially Believed

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Revolutionary research is investigating the exact quantity of carbon dioxide absorbed by tropical forests. This study is going to offer proper information regarding the effectiveness of these “carbon sinks” when it comes to climate risks caused by CO2 gas emissions.

It is often said that the more different species of plants in the forest, the more efficient in reducing carbon dioxide emissions is provided. The leading scientist, ecologist Florian Hofhansl, is stating that the primary purpose of the study is getting enough data in order to indicate precisely how much carbon is deducted by tropical vegetation.

Having this purpose in mind, the researchers’ main focus was determining the amount of carbon absorbed by different species of plants, as well as palms, trees, and lianas. They soon understood that the link between biotic and abiotic material is crucial in the amount of carbon immersion.

Scientists explored the diversity of tropical forest carbon sinks

For example, the soil properties affect the growth of the plant. Additionally, plants’ exposure to resources plays an essential role in getting the necessities to survive and develop. The areas with various water and nutrients contained more abundant fauna than the ones lacking resources.

Therefore, the study implies that there is no general formula to determine the impact of tropical fauna on the climate. Everything needs to be researched in-depth, using concrete areas and valid data. Facts from numerous other fields such as botany, geology, and plant ecology must be used to acquire an authentic overview of topical fauna’s input in reducing carbon discharge.

Consequently, Florian Hofhansl suggests that relevant statistics can be presented only when we are able to understand the complexity of the environment and tropical forest carbon sinks. Determining the exact participation of the environment in this process requires thorough research. We are still far from the truth.