SpaceX Starlink Satellites Might Affect The Visibility Of The Night Sky, Astronomers Think

By , in News Sci/Tech on . Tagged width: ,

After several delays, the first stage of the Starlink initiative was completed successfully as SpaceX managed to launch a group of 60 satellites.
The achievement of the company has made several astronomers unhappy as both professional and amateur researchers worry about how the satellite trains could impact the visibility of the night sky in the future. The response offered by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has failed to impress them.

Astronomers worry that SpaceX Starlink would affect the visibility of the night sky

For people who live in a remote area, Starlink has the potential to be a real boon. SpaceX promises that customers will get access to a high-speed internet connection at an affordable price. However, it seems that another price may have to be paid for this benefit.

When the Starlink initiative was announced, astronomers thought that soft glow emitted by the satellite would not be strong enough to affect their research.

After the deployment of the first satellite group, many researchers discovered that the light is considerably stronger in comparison to what was expected, but they hope that the situation will be addressed after the solar panels will be oriented appropriately to gather energy from the sun.

SpaceX Starlink satellites are visible with the naked eye

It seems that the satellite is so bright that they can be seen with the naked eye the viewers are in a rural area, or at least a place where the light pollution can’t mingle with the observation process.

It is known that satellite has played a significant role in the improvement of the quality of life across the world. They make communication possible, offer vital data about the weather and substantial phenomena and power useful services, among which we can count the GPS.

The Starlink satellites attracted the attention of many people since they can be spotted easily on the night sky, in the shape of a line made out of dots. Another concern comes from the fact that the low-orbit space is getting quite crowded, and a single impact could trigger a massive chain reaction.